Can Your New Life “Redeem” Your Past Life?

Redeeming Factor

Before I review this ebook, I want to share this quote:

‘It is important that the deceased is left in peace for 68 hours after dying so that the person in question has discarded all his bodily elements. Then you are ready for moving through the shaft. Before leaving I ask if there is anything unfinished, something that has not yet been realized and accepted and therefore cannot be resolved. It is not an easy process. It demands great care, empathy and poise. On the walls of the Shaft of the Soul you see pictures of the life, recently ended. We stop and look at the pictures that call for special attention, pictures of conflicts and trials from this incarnation. I ask if the deceased understands the pictures and is able to acknowledge the motives he acted from in the various situations. When the picture is understood I ask if the deceased is ready to let it go. Major things only are pictured in the shaft. Working our way up there are fewer pictures. There both is and isn’t any sense of space in the shaft. It is very difficult to describe. You experienced this yourself at Montségur. It is a kind of picture gallery where you are turning and watching the various pictures. It is in a way holographic. When the process of acknowledgement is finished and has turned into acceptance, you rise into a fantastic, intense light just before reaching the spiritual levels. Here the Collector is waiting, a ball-like thought form, collecting everything that you didn’t bring with you, everything that wasn’t redeemed. When I accompany the deceased we usually deal with it on the way. The deceased and I together correct the unresolved pictures and neutralize all the obstacles. If a helper isn’t present, or if people do not know what is going on in the Shaft of the Soul before they die, they may react to the pictures they are presented with without understanding, and do not do what is necessary before moving on. All pictures are collected in what I call the Collector. This is where one is met with a light more intense than the sun, but with a softness that enables us to see it. Here you meet the two pillars of light – guardians – about the same height as a human being. Then the voyage goes on to the spiritual levels. We do not bring the pictures there. There is no need for them. On the contrary. Later, on the way back to the level of earth, we pass the Collector again, going down into another Shaft of the Soul, confronting the pictures which were not resolved in the former life. We bring them with us into the new incarnation, where they influence us in one way or another. If we realize this here, we may practise, in the sense that every day we may ask if there is anything we should have done which we didn’t do, or if we did something that we shouldn’t have done. As far as I am concerned it is a part of my daily work to look at my own pictures in order to correct and I hope constantly to be in harmony with the universal principles and the work I’m here to perform. It is a guarantee for me to be precise in my work with other people. And there is always something that needs calibration. Everything is in eternal motion so that the pictures that were calibrated in the morning may need a new calibration in the evening. It is quite unbelievable how little it takes for things to tilt one way or the other. The idea that the wing of a butterfly should have an effect on the weather on the other side of the globe is thus very descriptive of my point. When we have redeemed all our pictures we have finished incarnating here on earth. The earth level is a school. We are talking about a refinement process where we must learn to be conscious co-workers in this universe, so that later we can do the same in the others.’

Muhl, Lars. The O Manuscript (pp. 134-136). Watkins Media. Kindle Edition.

The Story Outline on Amazon:

REDEEMING FACTOR by Lewis Adler is a full-length, thought-provoking thriller with a mysterious New Age twist in the tale, and one of the most unexpected and heart-warming conclusions you could ever wish to read in a work of fiction.

The Redeeming Factor plot opens in December 1943 at the Majdanek Nazi Extermination Camp on the outskirts of the Polish city of Lublin. Carl Meissner is a middle-ranking SS NCO and he has been given permission by the camp’s commandant to organise a mid-winter celebration for his colleagues. Among them is female camp guard Leyna Strobl with whom Carl has struck-up a close friendship.

Carl is an SS battleground veteran who was badly wounded in the left arm during Germany’s invasion of Poland. His injuries forced him out of frontline roles but, rather than leave the military, he opted for non-combatant duties. However, since being posted to Majdanek, he has become increasingly brutalized by what he has witnessed, and it has begun to play on his mind. Luckily for him, Leyna understands, because she too feels alienated by the horrors that surround them.

They long to escape the nightmare of Majdanek, and hope to do so by volunteering to escort a transfer of internees to a forced labour camp in Germany. A chance meeting on that assignment results in the escape they’d been longing for. Posted to Ulm in southern Germany, they begin working for a tough but kind-hearted SS officer, Erich Wendler.

As World War II draws to a close, Wendler relieves Carl and Leyna from their duties and encourages them to disappear into the community. Settling in Partenkirchen near the Austrian border, the young couple begin a new life together under assumed names.

Their happiness, however, doesn’t last long. Carl is captured by a vigilante group of former Majdanek internees. Cruelly separated from Leyna, he is imprisoned by the group and put on-trial, but not before he has befriended his jailer … a Jewish youth called Solomon Kellmann.

Following the trial’s verdict, Carl and Solomon are sitting chatting quietly when five hooded figures storm the cell in which the ex-SS NCO is being held. The intruders subdue both men and then lynch Carl, while the deeply distraught jailer is held fast and forced to look-on helplessly.

Some weeks later, in England, a baby boy – Derek Shortman – is born with his umbilical cord wrapped around his throat like a noose. He also has two curious birth marks on his left forearm. Derek grows into a fine young man but, from early childhood, he’s haunted by a recurring nightmare which, at first, depicts a violent separation between him and an unknown person he is trying to protect.

Over time, the nightmare evolves while – during his waking hours – Derek meets-up with several people who, inexplicably, he feels he has met before. The last of these characters is Beth Reynolds. She assists Derek in unraveling the true meaning of his nightmare. Together they visit Majdanek where, out of the blue, a remarkable encounter with a complete stranger occurs. In that moment, all three embark on an extraordinary journey of revelation, redemption and resolution.

My Review:

(Just so it’s out there, let me tell you that I know the author personally). The first half of the book takes us behind the scenes of a series of events in World War II, but from a German perspective. It is hard-going during the early chapters but once the death camp is left behind, it gets a bit easier. But only when you get to the second half, does it start to make sense. In the many love interests that Derek has, I glimpsed echoes of relationships that had been part of the first part of the story. It turns out that I correctly identified them all. The title says it all, and you will find it as fascinating as I did. Well done, Lewis. (Five stars)

Lewis Adler’s image courtesy of Stage32

About cdsmiller17

I am an Astrologer who also writes about world events. My first eBook "At This Point in Time" is available through most on-line book stores. I have now serialized my second book "The Star of Bethlehem" here. And I am experimenting with birth and death charts. If you wish to contact me, or request a birth chart, send an email to cdsmiller17@gmail.com
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