Mystery: Was the Travis Walton Experience a Hoax?

Fire in the Sky

Courtesy of Amazon

I read this book under its original title, The Walton Experience, years before the 1993 film based on his ‘true’ story. I didn’t like the film: it was too sensationalized, too dramatic.

Mike started the old pickup and we climbed north up the ridge toward the Rim Road. It was 6:10. Barring any breakdowns, we should be home before 7:30. We left the windows down so we could cool off some. We were still warm from laboring, in spite of the evening air. Mike, Ken, and I do not smoke and we prefer to inhale genuine, unadulterated air. The four in the backseat lit up as soon as we were in the truck, eager after hours without a cigarette. The fresh air coming in my window was bracing. We usually nap on the way to work every morning, but none of us ever feels drowsy on the way back to town. The rousing activity on the job hones a keenness that stays with us all the way home.

Bouncing over the water-bars in the road — humps of dirt that prevent the road from washing out in the rainy season — the truck kept bottoming out on its springs with a dull clunking sound. The fellows started cracking jokes about the pickup.

Just then my eye was caught by a light coming through the trees on the right, a hundred yards ahead. I idly assumed that the glow was the sun going down in the west. Then it occurred to me that the sun had set half an hour ago. Curious, I thought it might be the light of some hunters camped there — headlights or maybe a fire. Some of the guys must have caught sight of it too, because the men on the right side of the truck had fallen silent.

As we continued driving up the road toward the brightness, we passed in sight of it for an instant. We barely got a glimpse through gnarled branches before we rolled past the opening in the trees.

“Son of a . . .” Allen started.

“What the hell was that?” I asked.

My eyes strained to make sense of the glimmering through the dense stand of trees blocking our vision. From my open window, I could see the yellowish brilliance washing across our path onto the road another forty yards ahead. Intrigued, I was impatient to get past the intervening pines.

From the driver’s seat, Mike could not look up with the proper angle without leaning way over, “What do you guys see?” he demanded curiously.

Dwayne answered, “I don’t know — but it looked like a crashed plane hanging in a tree!”

Finally, our growing excitement spurred Mike into wringing out what little speed the pickup could still achieve on the incline. We rolled past the intervening evergreen thicket to where we could have an unobstructed view of the source of the strange radiance. Suddenly we were electrified by the most awesome, incredible sight we had seen in our entire lives.

“Stop!” John cried out. “Stop the truck!”

As the truck skidded to a dusty halt in the rocky road, I threw open the door for a clearer view of the dazzling sight.

“My God!” Allen yelled. “It’s a flying saucer!

The Walton Experience

OK. There’s just one inconjunct, so this may be an easy one to decipher.

Mercury Inconjunct Ascendant

You are likely to have some problems, but not serious ones, in communicating with others. The problem is that people’s first impression of you may not fit in with what you say or your manner of thinking and speaking. People tend to hear what they expect to hear, and they may not listen to you as carefully as they should. So you will have to be as clear as possible and insist that others listen to what you are really saying. If others do not understand you, it is up to you to set them straight.

This pattern also works in reverse in that what you say may make people respond in ways that you can’t accept. For example, you may be outspoken and frank but dislike it when others are, preferring to be treated gently and sensitively.

Is this a symptom of a ‘failure to communicate’?

His fellow workers left him for dead, and the rest is a blur for Travis. He was missing for five-and-a-quarter days, and then he showed up again.

Walton has claimed he remembers nothing else until he found himself walking along a highway five days later, with the flying saucer departing above him.

In 1978, Walton wrote the book The Walton Experience detailing his claims, which became the basis for the 1993 film Fire in the Sky. Paramount Pictures decided Walton’s account was “too fuzzy and too similar to other televised close encounters”, so they ordered screenwriter Tracy Tormé to write a “flashier, more provocative” abduction story.

Wikipedia

So how do we know if any of it happened? The mind does strange tricks when confronted by an alien situation… (See what I did there?)

Filling in the obvious blanks of his story may have triggered cryptomnesia, and Travis may have repeated a scenario from the Hill Abduction, the medical examination. His panic would be palpable. He was scared for his life. The other elements of the film, like of being wrapped in a kind of spider’s web of material, are a step too far. But, in defense of Travis’ memory, I think the abduction did happen, but not necessarily as he has described it in his book.

So, not a ‘hoax’ per se: more likely the Mandela Effect.

About cdsmiller17

I am an Astrologer who also writes about world events. My first eBook "At This Point in Time" is available through most on-line book stores. I have now serialized my second book "The Star of Bethlehem" here. And I am experimenting with birth and death charts. If you wish to contact me, or request a birth chart, send an email to cdsmiller17@gmail.com
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