My Friend Ascends His Dystonic Tremor Symptoms

David Lowe (a.k.a. Lewis Adler)

Image courtesy of stage32.com

David and I have been friends since his days on BBC Radio Devon & Cornwall. In 1992, I was his guest on the Sunday Late Show over several weeks. My first time was the week before his D-Day anniversary show. This is chronicled in my book “At This Point in Time”.

As a D.J. and show presenter, David has had an interesting career, including national news coverage about a complaint about the N-word in a song from the early 1930’s. One complaint…

(Did you even hear it? I didn’t.) But to quell the controversy, David offered to resign from the BBC. They accepted. Then the newspapers had a field day, since other presenters (like Jeremy Clarkson) had done the same without any consequence. This was back in May of 2014. It seems to me that the ‘cancel culture’ took an early hostage.

By the time I knew David, he had a slight tremor in his right hand. It made for a tricky job lining up records on the turntable, which was made easier by the takeover of CDs in musical history. But David has always worked through his physical restrictions. And now, all these years later, he is acting in TV dramas, such as an episode of the BBC’s “Doctors” this past month. He had previously been on ITV’s “Casualty” eight years ago. (He sent me an abridged video file of his “Doctors” performance, and I must say that it was masterful.)

Yesterday, I discovered Lewis Adler’s YouTube videos. Here is the one I shared on Facebook:

This is an excellent example of David’s ‘one-in-a-million’ voice.

Here’s the other video:

That bio-bit about David being a rock musician earlier in his life may be a hint as to why he’s got dystonic tremor now.

The cause of dystonic tremor isn’t really well known, but it doesn’t seem to be degenerative – so cells aren’t dying in the brain. It might be the fact that a little damage has been done – a tiny blood vessel gets blocked off. Or alternatively, we see it in patients who might have a specific profession like bricklayers or musicians, where they’re doing a repeated action that they don’t think about – repetitively. Interestingly, what causes the tremor is this dystonic phenomenon and dystonia is something that you may not have heard of, but you will have heard of dystonic conditions, such as writers cramp or torticollis. So torticollis is where the neck is twisted off by contractions of the neck muscles. Whereas writers cramp, of course as you’re writing the hand goes into a spasm.

Prof. Simon Lewis

Anyway, I just wanted to share this with you, as it is important to see past the disability, to the man.

Bless.

About cdsmiller17

I am an Astrologer who also writes about world events. My first eBook "At This Point in Time" is available through most on-line book stores. I have now serialized my second book "The Star of Bethlehem" here. And I am experimenting with birth and death charts. If you wish to contact me, or request a birth chart, send an email to cdsmiller17@gmail.com. (And, in case you are also interested, I have an extensive list of celebrity birth and death details if you wish to 'confirm' what you suspect may be a past-life experience of yours.) Bless.
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3 Responses to My Friend Ascends His Dystonic Tremor Symptoms

  1. davidllowe says:

    Thank you so much Chris, dear friend, for your support and your kind words of encouragement. They’re very much appreciated! The way I see it is, my guitar playing days were finally wiped-out by the tremor symptoms in the mid-1980s but, thank goodness, by then, I had established myself in radio. However, as the symptoms deteriorated, I reluctantly decided to stop my (then) fledgling TV and film work in 1997. Around ten years later, I came into contact with Louise Dyson, the founder and CEO of the VisABLE People Agency which searches for opportunities for disabled actors, presenters and models. Louise invited me onto her books and, since then, I’ve worked in TV and film with the intention of getting my disability to work FOR me instead of AGAINST me. It seems to be paying-off, because just after I finished filming my final scene in ‘Doctors’, Lotus Hannan, the director, came over to thank me, and she added, “Lewis, you’re an inspiration!” Nobody has ever said anything quite like that to me before, not even my parents or sibling. Her words meant the world to me … still do … as do yours Chris. Many thanks again.

    Liked by 1 person

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